Is CBD Legal In Your State?

Increasingly, more states are legalizing medical or recreational marijuana, but the laws vary from state to state. Specific legislation around hemp, marijuana, and CBD is in a constant of flux.

Still, much of the news coverage focuses on marijuana. So, where does that leave CBD?

As of December 2018, CBD is legal nationwide, federally. That seems straightforward enough at first glance, but the legality of CBD in your state is likely a bit more complicated. It depends on which state you live in, and whether your particular CBD product was sourced from industrial hemp or marijuana.

While a majority of CBD products are sourced from hemp, they can also be sourced from marijuana, which contains THC. Recreational marijuana is only legal in ten states and Washington, D.C. Unless you live in one of those states, you need to be careful about where your CBD products are sourced from, or you could be breaking the law.

In this guide, we’ve provided a recap of the current legislation on CBD, organized by state. But first, we review the history of CBD legislation in the U.S.

To go straight to the state-by-state guide, click here.

A quick history of CBD legislation in the United States

It may be hard to believe, but there was a time when hemp and marijuana weren’t criminalized. Many early American farmers grew hemp, and not all of them were using it to get high. Industrial hemp has wide-ranging applications as an agricultural commodity. Commercial hemp can be grown as a seed and a fiber, and it’s used in a variety of products, including cosmetics, textiles, paper, and construction materials.

1937: The criminalization of marijuana begins

However, because hemp and marijuana come from the same plant, Cannabis Sativa, they got lumped together under the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937. The law was primarily designed to discourage the recreational use of marijuana, but it also imposed heavy taxes on those growing cannabis and hemp for other purposes. As a result, farmers moved away from growing hemp, and the broader association (and confusion) of all cannabis with marijuana began.  

The problem here was not just that the economic viability of hemp was cut off at the pass, but that hemp is very different from marijuana from a drug perspective. Marijuana evokes its characteristic stoned feeling due to one key psychoactive ingredient: tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. Marijuana contains 15% to 40% of THC.

Conversely, hemp only contains 0.3% of THC. Even though hemp and marijuana both derive from the Cannabis Sativa plant, CBD, or cannabidiol, is the primary compound in hemp products. And CBD, unlike THC, contains no psychoactive properties. In fact, CBD can even counteract the psychoactive effects of THC.

1970: Cannabis gets classified as a Schedule I drug

Nevertheless, all strains of cannabis continued to be classified together, and so did THC and CBD. When the federal government passed the Controlled Substances Act in 1970, hemp was included along with marijuana as a Schedule I drug—the same category as significantly more dangerous drugs like heroin. Considering that CBD has no psychoactive properties, this seems like a bit of an overreach.

In the 1990s, a few states took up the banner for hemp. Several enacted state legislation to allow hemp production. However, due to the federal ban and the publicity of being a Schedule I drug, industrial hemp production had trouble getting off the ground.

2014: Congress passes the Farm Bill

It wasn’t until 2014 that hemp enjoyed some legalization again, with the 2014 Farm Bill.

Section 7606 of the bill defined industrial hemp as Cannabis Sativa containing 0.3% of THC or less. It allowed state agriculture departments and institutions of higher education to cultivate hemp for the purposes of agricultural or academic research. It also provided avenues for farmers interested in growing hemp to get certified by their state agriculture department. Importantly, the bill extended the jurisdiction of hemp production from the DEA alone to also include the USDA and FDA—opening the door for future regulation.

Fairly quickly, hemp production began to blossom. As of June 2018, U.S. hemp products make about $700 million in sales annually. Even more promising, researchers are finding new use cases for hemp, such as its potential for a biofuel or animal feed.

2018: Hemp-sourced CBD enjoys federal legalization

Thanks to the success of these state research programs, lawmakers were able to propose and pass The Hemp Farming Act in December 2018. The Act was included in the 2018 Farm Bill, which is officially known as the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018.

The bill, which was signed into law in December 2018, defines hemp as “the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of that plant, including the seeds thereof and all derivatives, extracts, cannabinoids, isomers, acids, salts, and salts of isomers, whether growing or not, with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis.”

The bill makes hemp an agricultural commodity and removes it from the controlled substances list, thus removing it from the oversight of the DEA. In other words, any industrial hemp product is now legal on a federal level nationwide, including CBD.

How the federal farm bill translates to state law

However, the 2018 Farm Bill also gives states the ability to oversee hemp production, which means they can restrict it as well. Three states have taken advantage of that right, as the legal status of CBD oil products is still unsettled in three states: Idaho, Nebraska, and South Dakota.

The laws in your state can also vary, depending on your intended use for the CBD and where it was sourced from.

If you live in Washington, D.C., or in the the one of the ten states who have legalized marijuana for recreational use, you’ll enjoy the least restrictions. CBD will be federally legal in your state, and it’s also legal on a state level regardless of whether it comes from hemp or marijuana.

states that legalized marijuana for recreational use

Over 30 states have legalized medical marijuana. However, even in these states, medical CBD sourced from marijuana may have some restrictions. Typically, it’s only permissible if the patient has a qualifying condition, and in a number of states, it’s only approved for cases of intractable epilepsy.

To learn more, review your state’s laws below.

CBD Laws by State

Here’s an overview of the legal status of CBD in each state, as of January 2019. We provide details on each state’s laws below, including any qualifications about the approved use cases for medical CBD.

StateHemp-sourced CBD for any useMarijuana-sourced CBD for medical useMarijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use
AlabamaLegalLegalIllegal
AlaskaLegalLegalLegal
ArizonaLegalUndecidedIllegal
ArkansasLegalLegalLegal
CaliforniaLegalLegalLegal
ColoradoLegalLegalLegal
ConnecticutLegalLegalIllegal
DelawareLegalLegalIllegal
FloridaLegalLegalIllegal
GeorgiaLegalLegalIllegal
HawaiiLegalLegalIllegal
IdahoIllegalIllegalIllegal
IllinoisLegalLegalIllegal
IndianaLegalLegalIllegal
IowaLegalLegalIllegal
KansasLegalIllegalIllegal
KentuckyLegalLegalIllegal
LouisianaLegalLegalIllegal
MaineLegalLegalLegal
MarylandLegalLegalIllegal
MassachusettsLegalLegalLegal
MichiganLegalLegalLegal
MinnesotaLegalLegalIllegal
MississippiLegalLegalIllegal
MissouriLegalLegalIllegal
MontanaLegalLegalIllegal
NebraskaIllegalIllegalIllegal
NevadaLegalLegalLegal
New HampshireLegalLegalIllegal
New JerseyLegalLegalIllegal
New MexicoLegalLegalIllegal
New YorkLegalLegalIllegal
North CarolinaLegalLegalIllegal
North DakotaLegalLegalIllegal
OhioLegalLegalIllegal
OklahomaLegalLegalIllegal
OregonLegalLegalLegal
PennsylvaniaLegalLegalIllegal
Rhode IslandLegalLegalIllegal
South CarolinaLegalLegalIllegal
South DakotaUnclearUnclearIllegal
TennesseeLegalLegalIllegal
TexasLegalLegalIllegal
UtahLegalLegalIllegal
VermontLegalLegalLegal
VirginiaLegalLegalIllegal
WashingtonLegalLegalLegal
Washington, D.C.LegalLegalLegal
West VirginiaLegalLegalIllegal
WisconsinLegalLegalIllegal
WyomingLegalLegalIllegal

Alabama

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

In accordance with the 2018 Farm Bill, hemp-sourced CBD is legal in the state of Alabama, according to a public notice from the State Attorney General. Specifically, CBD sourced from marijuana is legal for treating debilitating seizures (Carly’s Law, 2014), and can be possessed by the parents and legal guardians of these parents (Leni’s Law, 2016).

However, possession of marijuana for personal use is a Class A misdemeanor, as recreational marijuana is not legal in Alabama.

Alaska

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: LEGAL

Marijuana has been legalized for both medical and recreational use in Alaska. However, Alaska hasn’t yet produced hemp under their industrial hemp pilot program (Senate Bill 6), so technically any CBD products could be in violation of state law—although it’s not being enforced, according to Senator Mitch McConnell.

Arizona

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: UNCLEAR
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Medical marijuana is legalized in Arizona (Proposition 203, 2010). However, the courts have interpreted the law to exclude cannabis extracts, as well as CBD, since Arizona law still defines cannabis as separate from marijuana.

As a result, individuals who are approved for medical marijuana use have been charged with criminal possession of a drug when they’ve innocently purchased CBD. Judges continue to disagree as cases like this go back and forth in the courts. Until these reach the Arizona Supreme Court, the legal status of marijuana-sourced CBD for medical users remains unclear.  

Arkansas

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: LEGAL

In 2016, Arkansas legalized medical marijuana under the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Amendment, which resulted in clear guidelines for the labeling of THC and CBD products for medical use. A year later, it instituted an industrial hemp pilot program (Arkansas Industrial Hemp Act, 2017).

California

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: LEGAL

Marijuana has been legalized for both medical and recreational use in California (Senate Bill 420, 2003, and California Food and Agricultural Code, Division 24, 2016). That means that CBD products, whether they are sourced from hemp or marijuana, are legal in California—with one exception. The California Department of Health prohibits CBD being added to food (including pet food), until it has been approved by the FDA as a safe food ingredient, additive, or dietary supplement.

Colorado

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: LEGAL

Marijuana has been legalized for both medical and recreational use in Colorado (Colorado Constitution, Article XVIII, Section 14, 2000). Further, Colorado has very pro-hemp legislation that’s intended to separate the legal definitions of hemp and marijuana. Colorado’s industrial hemp pilot program only regulates the cultivation of hemp, but not the sale or distribution of it.

Connecticut

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

In 2012, Connecticut passed HB 5389, which legalized medical marijuana in the state. In 2015, it passed HB 5780, which legalized industrial hemp. However, unauthorized possession of recreational marijuana is still illegal in Connecticut—either by fines for possession of less than 0.5 oz, or a Class A Misdemeanor for 0.5 oz or more.

Delaware

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Medical marijuana is legal in Delaware, but only for approved conditions (Delaware Medical Marijuana Act, 2011). Patients and their caregivers can receive an ID card to possess 6 ounces or less. Under Rylie’s Law (SB 90), passed in 2015, CBD oil sourced from marijuana was also legalized for medical use, providing that it contain no more than 7% THC.

However, marijuana (and all products sourced from marijuana) for recreational use is still a punishable offense under state law. The state also has an industrial hemp pilot program.

Florida

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

As of 2017, medical marijuana became legal in Florida under Article X Section 29 of the Florida Constitution. Marijuana-sourced CBD products intended for medical use in Florida are also legal, under specific conditions. Section 381.986 of the Florida Statutes defines low-THC cannabis products as those with 0.8% or less of THC and more than 10% of CBD. These can be prescribed by physicians for qualifying medical conditions.

However, recreational marijuana is still prohibited under the Florida Criminal Code and punishable as a misdemeanor or felony, depending on whether the individual has more than 20 grams. Florida began their industrial hemp pilot program in 2017.

Georgia

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Under Haleigh’s Hope Act, passed in 2015, Georgia allows for marijuana-sourced CBD to be used to treat medical conditions. However, the CBD oil must contain less than 5% THC and the CBD must be equal to or greater than the THC. It can only be prescribed for approved qualifying conditions, including end-stage cancer, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, seizure disorders, multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, mitochondrial disease, Parkinson’s disease, and sickle cell disease.

As for recreational use of marijuana, the laws are changing in Georgia at the time of writing. A 2017 court decision decriminalized personal use and possession of marijuana (although the individual can still be fined), but the sale, distribution, and production is still illegal.

Hawaii

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Hawaii has an industrial hemp pilot program, and it’s legalized marijuana for medical use since 200 (SB 862). However, recreational marijuana is still illegal in the state.

Idaho

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: ILLEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: ILLEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Unfortunately, Idaho is one of three states that has restrictions on all forms of cannabis, despite the 2018 Farm Bill legalizing industrial hemp on a federal level. The only exception is for pediatric patients with extreme forms of epilepsy—but even they are only permitted to be prescribed Epidiolex (a FDA-approved drug that contains CBD), rather than CBD oil itself.

Because Section 37-2701 of Idaho Code defines marijuana as “all parts of the plant of the genus Cannabis, regardless of species,” CBD is illegal in Idaho. This creates a significant gray area for citizens of Idaho who may only be using CBD legally if they are on federal ground.

Illinois

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Illinois legalized medical marijuana in 2013 under the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act. The state also has an industrial hemp pilot program. In 2018, the state passed legislation that officially legalized the sale and use of CBD oil with 0.3% THC or less (SB 2772).

While Illinois’ laws on marijuana are more lenient than other states (possession of 10 grams is just a Civil Violation), recreational marijuana is still illegal here.

Indiana

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Medical marijuana is not legalized in Indiana. However, using medical CBD to treat epilepsy is legal under HB 1148. The state began their industrial hemp pilot program in 2016. In 2018, they passed Senate Bill 52, which expanded the legal protections towards CBD, specifically legalized the sale and use of CBD products with 0.3% THC or less.

Iowa

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Iowa does not have an industrial hemp pilot program, nor is medical marijuana legalized in the state. Recreational marijuana is also illegal in Iowa.

However, a medical CBD program is under development (Medical Cannabidiol Act, 2018). Currently, qualifying medical conditions include end-stage cancer, chemotherapy induced vomiting, seizures, Crohn’s disease, untreatable pain, multiple sclerosis, AIDS or HIV, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, or any terminal illness with a life expectancy of 1 year or less. The CBD product must contain 3% THC or less.

Kansas

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: ILLEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Neither medical or recreational marijuana has been legalized in Kansas. However, the state passed a law in 2018 that removed hemp products with 0% THC from the controlled substances list (SB 282), essentially legalizing CBD products sourced from hemp. In the same year, the state also created an industrial hemp pilot program. CBD sourced from marijuana is still illegal under Kansas law if it contains significant levels of THC.

Kentucky

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

The Clara Madeline Gilliam Act (SB 124), passed in 2014, exempted CBD from the Kentucky definition of marijuana drugs and allowed it to be administered by physicians at state research hospitals, institutions of higher education, or in clinical trials. Marijuana is still illegal in Kentucky, so CBD products containing high amounts of THC are as well, unless they are covered under SB 124. In 2016, Kentucky began their industrial hemp pilot program.

Louisiana

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Louisiana legalized medical marijuana in 2017 (SB 261), but recreational use is still illegal. There are no specific laws pertaining to CBD in the state, nor an industrial hemp pilot program.

Maine

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: LEGAL

Marijuana has been legalized for both medical and recreational use in Maine. Medical marijuana was legal in Maine as far back as 1999, but it wasn’t until the Maine Medical Marijuana Act of 2009 that it became official. In 2015, Maine legalized commercial hemp production (Maine Revised Statutes 2231). The next year, Maine voters approved legalizing recreational marijuana use. All CBD products are legal in Maine, regardless of intended use or cannabis source.

Maryland

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

The Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission manages the state’s medical marijuana program. In 2015, HB 803 changed the definition of marijuana to exclude industrial hemp, removing it from the controlled substances list. The industrial hemp pilot program was established in 2016 under HB 443. In 2018, under HB 693, the program was expanded to further commercial production of industrial hemp in the state. Recreational marijuana is still illegal in Maryland.

Massachusetts

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: LEGAL

Marijuana has been legalized for both medical and recreational use in Massachusetts. The state legalized medical use in 2012, and recreational use in 2016. The industrial hemp pilot program launched in 2017.

Michigan

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: LEGAL

Marijuana has been legalized for both medical and recreational use in Michigan since 2008 and 2018, respectively. In 2014, Michigan amended the definition of marijuana to exclude industrial hemp with 0.3% THC or less (HB 5440). The state established its industrial hemp pilot program in 2016.

Minnesota

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Minnesota legalized medical marijuana in 2014 (SF 2471). The state’s medical cannabis program covers a long list of qualifying conditions. In addition to the standard conditions that are approved in most states, Minnesota’s qualifying conditions also include Alzheimer’s and obstructive sleep apnea. The state also has an industrial hemp pilot program. Recreational marijuana is still illegal in Minnesota.

Mississippi

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Under Harper Grace’s Law (HB 1231, 2014), CBD products were legalized for patients with severe epilepsy as recommended by a licensed physician. The CBD product can contain no more than 0.5% THC, and must contain more than 15% CBD.

Mississippi does not have an industrial hemp pilot program. While marijuana is not legal, it has been decriminalized to an extent. For an individual’s first offense, possession of 30 grams or less is only punishable by a maximum $250 fine.

Missouri

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

In December 2018, Missouri legalized medical marijuana under Constitutional Amendment 2.

Previously, medical CBD was only legal if the hemp extract product contained 0.3% THC or less, and at least 5% CBD (HB 2238, 2014). This bill was also enacted specifically for patients with intractable epilepsy. Under the new 2018 law, the medical cannabis program has been expanded to include medical marijuana and a range of qualifying conditions.

The state also have an industrial hemp pilot program. Recreational marijuana is still illegal in Missouri.

Montana

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Montana has both a medical marijuana program and an industrial hemp pilot program (Montana Code Annotated, Title 80, Chapter 18, 2017). The medical marijuana program was first enacted in 2004. Recreational marijuana is still illegal in Montana.

Nebraska

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: ILLEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: ILLEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Nebraska does has an industrial hemp pilot program, but cannabis of all forms is highly restricted in this state. Currently, CBD is still included in the legal definition of marijuana under Nebraska’s Uniform Controlled Substances Act.

In 2015, Nebraska passed LB 390, which allowed CBD to be prescribed for individuals with intractable epilepsy, but only to patients accepted into the state Medical Cannabidiol Pilot Study. That study will expire in 2019.

In preparation for that expiration date, the State Attorney General released a statement clarifying that because CBD is still classified as marijuana, the only other current legal exception for CBD products are drugs that have been approved by the FDA. To date, that only includes Epidiolex, a CBD oral spray for severe epilepsy.

Because CBD from industrial hemp is legal on a federal level, thanks to the 2018 Farm Bill, this leaves the current overall legal status of CBD in Nebraska murky at best.

Nevada

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: LEGAL

Marijuana has been legalized for both medical and recreational use in Nevada (NRS 453A, 2000, and NRS 453D, 2016). The state also has an industrial hemp pilot program.

New Hampshire

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

New Hampshire legalized medical marijuana in 2013 (HB 573) and established an industrial hemp pilot program in 2015. Recreational marijuana is still illegal in New Hampshire.

New Jersey

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

New Jersey’s medicinal marijuana program was passed into law in 2009 (SB 119). It does not have an industrial hemp pilot program yet, and recreational marijuana is still illegal.

New Mexico

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Medical marijuana is legal in New Mexico (SB 523, 2007). The state has an industrial hemp pilot program (SB 6, 2017). New Mexico was also the first state to approve medical cannabis as a treatment for PTSD. Recreational marijuana is still illegal in New Mexico.

New York

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

New York’s industrial hemp pilot program was launched in 2015 and continues to receive significant funding from the state. The state also legalized medical marijuana in 2014 (AB A6357E). However, recreational use of marijuana is still illegal in New York.

North Carolina

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

North Carolina does not have a medical marijuana program, but it does allow CBD products to be prescribed for intractable epilepsy (HB 766, 2015). The products must contain less than 0.9% THC and at least 5% CBD. As of 2016, the state also has an industrial hemp pilot program. Recreational marijuana is still illegal in North Carolina.

North Dakota

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

In 2016, North Dakota legalized medical marijuana under the North Dakota Compassionate Care Act. It also instituted an industrial hemp pilot program. However, recreational marijuana is still illegal in North Dakota.

Ohio

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Ohio legalized medical marijuana in 2016 (HB 523). The state’s Medical Marijuana Control Program was supposed to launch in fall of 2018, but is experiencing delays.

Meanwhile, the State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy released a FAQ stating that recreational CBD products were still illegal, as they are still defined as marijuana under Section 3719.01 of the Ohio Revised Code and were considered illegal at a federal level. However, this was issued before the 2018 Farm Bill was passed, so it may be safe to assume the CBD sourced from hemp, as well as medical CBD, is now legal in the state of Ohio.

Oklahoma

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

In 2018, Oklahoma passed legislation to establish both a state medical marijuana program (SQ 788) and an industrial hemp pilot program (HB 2913). Additionally, Oklahoma state law classifies CBD separately from marijuana. CBD sourced from hemp with 0.3% THC or less is allowed to be sold and used throughout the state.

Prior to this legislation, medical CBD with higher levels of THC was permitted to be prescribed to patients with severe epilepsy and a few other conditions (HB 2154, 2015).

Oregon

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: LEGAL

Marijuana has been legalized for both medical and recreational use in Oregon (SB 161, 2007, and Measure 91, 2014). The state also has an industrial hemp pilot program.

Pennsylvania

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

In 2016, Pennsylvania passed legislation to establish a medical marijuana program (SB 3). The state also has an industrial hemp pilot program. Recreational marijuana is still illegal in Pennsylvania.

Rhode Island

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Rhode Island has an industrial hemp pilot program and a medical marijuana program (SB 791, 2007, and SB 185, 2009). Recreational use of marijuana is still illegal in Rhode Island.

South Carolina

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

South Carolina’s medical CBD law, the Medical Cannabis Therapeutic Treatment Act, or “Julian’s Law,” was passed in 2014 (SB 1035). The law allows CBD products with at least 98% CBD and 0.9% or less THC to be prescribed for patients with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, Dravet Syndrome, and other severe forms of epilepsy. The state also has an industrial hemp pilot program. Recreational marijuana is illegal in South Carolina.

South Dakota

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Along with Idaho and Nebraska, South Dakota has the strictest laws on cannabis in the country. Possession of just 2 ounces or less is a misdemeanor with up to a 1 year prison sentence and a $2,000 fine. The state doesn’t have a medical marijuana program or an industrial hemp pilot program.

In 2017, South Dakota passed SB 95, which requires medical CBD products to be approved by the FDA in order to be legal. Currently, Epidiolex is the only drug on that list.

The bill also removed CBD from the definition of marijuana and reclassified it as a Schedule IV controlled substance, instead of Schedule I. However, that still criminalized CBD in a way that contradicts the federal legalization of CBD sourced from hemp. In January 2019, South Dakota’s Health and Human Services Committed passed an amendment that clarified that possession of hemp CBD, without a prescription, is legal.

Tennessee

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

In 2014, Tennessee passed HB 2445, which updated the state criminal code to remove industrial hemp from the definition of marijuana. Also in 2014, the state passed SB 2531, which allowed CBD oil to be prescribed to treat intractable epilepsy as part of a clinical research study. A year later, Tennessee expanded the law to allow CBD oil (with 0.9% THC or less) to be prescribed to treat intractable epilepsy by authorized physicians (HB 197).

The state has an industrial hemp pilot program. Marijuana for either recreational or medical use is still illegal in Tennessee.

Texas

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Texas does not yet have an industrial hemp pilot program, and marijuana remains illegal in the state, for either recreational or medical use. However, the state does allow low-THC cannabis products to be prescribed to patients with intractable epilepsy (SB 339, 2015). The product must contain 0.5% THC or less, and at least 10% CBD.

Utah

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Passed in 2018, Utah’s Hemp and Cannabidiol Act defined and clearly legalized industrial hemp CBD in various forms, from tablets to gelatinous cubes. Also in 2018, Utah legalized medical marijuana (Prop 2). Recreational marijuana is still illegal.

Utah has also legalized medical CBD. In 2014, Utah passed the Hemp Extract Registration Act legalized hemp extract (with at least 15% CBD) to be prescribed to intractable epilepsy patients. The state started their industrial hemp pilot program in 2016.

Vermont

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: LEGAL

Marijuana has been legalized for both medical and recreational use in Vermont. In 2018, Vermont actually became the first state to legalize recreational marijuana through the legislative process, as opposed to a ballot initiative (H.511). Vermont legalized medical marijuana in 2004 and continues to add qualifying conditions to the approved list. The state has an industrial hemp pilot program.

Virginia

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Virginia originally legalized the medical use of CBD oil and THC-A oil to treat intractable epilepsy in 2015 (HB 1445). In 2018, Virginia passed a bill that broadly expanded the legalization of medical CBD oil to be prescribed for “any diagnosed condition or disease determined by the practitioner to benefit from such use” (HB 1251). Virginia launched its industrial hemp pilot program after the 2014 Farm Bill was passed. Recreational marijuana is still illegal in Virginia.

Washington

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: LEGAL

Marijuana has been legalized for both medical and recreational use in Washington. Under Washington state law, any CBD products with 0.3% THC or less are not defined as marijuana or considered controlled substances.

After Colorado, Washington was the second state to legalize marijuana for recreational use in 2012 with Initiative 502. The state’s medical marijuana program was first established in 1998 with Initiative 692. Washington also has an industrial hemp research pilot program.

Washington, D.C.

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: LEGAL

Marijuana has been legalized for both medical and recreational use in Washington, D.C. In 2014, Washington DC Initiative 71 went into effect in Washington,, D.C., legalizing personal  marijuana use. The law has significant constraints on how much marijuana a person can possess, and they’re not able to sell marijuana.

West Virginia

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Medical marijuana recently became legalized in West Virginia under the Medical Cannabis Act (SB 386). The state launched its industrial hemp pilot program in 2016. Marijuana for recreational use is still illegal in West Virginia.

Wisconsin

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Both recreational and medical use of marijuana remain illegal in Wisconsin. However, the state has medical CBD legislation and an industrial hemp pilot program. In 2013, Wisconsin passed AB 726, which allows CBD oil to be prescribed to treat seizure disorders.

Wyoming

  • Hemp-sourced CBD: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for medical use only: LEGAL
  • Marijuana-sourced CBD for recreational use: ILLEGAL

Both recreational and medical use of marijuana remain illegal in Wyoming. However, the state passed legislation in 2015 allowing for CBD hemp extract (0.3% THC or less, with 5% or more CBD) to be prescribed to treat patients with intractable epilepsy (HB 32). Wyoming’s industrial hemp pilot program is just getting started.

Editor’s Note:

This article is for informational purposes only. Consult your state’s Criminal Code or Agriculture Department for the most up-to-date information on regulation of CBD in your state.

Last updated: January 2019.


If you spend any time following health news online, you’ve probably heard of CBD. Short for cannabidiol, CBD comes from hemp, or the Cannabis Sativa plant. In recent years, interest in CBD has skyrocketed.

This is partly due to the fact that its psychoactive counterpart, THC, has been legalized to varying extents in a majority of states. While the legal debate over marijuana continues on a national level, people have looked into alternative ways to enjoy the health benefits without the high. Enter CBD.

Because CBD and THC both come from cannabis, the plant source for hemp and marijuana, there’s a lot of confusion about CBD, how it works, and what makes it different from THC. However, CBD is distinct from THC. For one thing, it doesn’t get you high. That’s a big reason why CBD is becoming so popular. CBD provides a wealth of health benefits without the “stoned” effect of marijuana.

There’s a lot more to know about CBD, though. To determine whether CBD can help you, and understand what it can treat, you need to wade through the hype to get at the truth.

That’s what this article is for. We break down everything you need to know about CBD, from how it affects your body to how you can purchase safe and legal CBD products.

What is CBD?

CBD is one of over 100 naturally occurring chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant. Since these compounds were discovered in the cannabis plant, they were named after it: cannabinoids. Another well-known cannabinoid is THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol.

The cannabis plant itself is categorized into two main families: Cannabis Indica and Cannabis Sativa. CBD and THC appear in both types of cannabis. However, the concentration of CBD or THC depends on whether the plant was sourced from marijuana or hemp.

Marijuana, which contains between 15 to 40% THC, comes from either Indica or Sativa. Hemp, on the other hand, comes from Cannabis Sativa alone. Hemp only contains 0.3% THC or less, and instead has a much higher concentration of CBD.

Typically, when you purchase CBD oil, it comes from industrial hemp. Although, occasionally, CBD products can also be sourced from marijuana. These will have a higher amount of THC, and may even cause you to test positive for marijuana use.

Does CBD get you high?

No. Unlike THC, CBD is a non-psychoactive component of cannabis. When you ingest CBD, you will not get high. In fact, CBD can counteract or lessen the high of THC.

Because CBD lacks the psychoactive effects of THC, many individuals view CBD products as a preferable alternative to marijuana. They can enjoy the health benefits of CBD, which range from pain and anxiety relief to reduced migraines and inflammation, without feeling stoned. This is especially appealing to those who are prone to experience the negative side effects of THC, such as increased anxiety.

Besides the intended benefit, such as pain relief, ingesting CBD may also cause you to feel a general sense of relaxation, lightness, or clarity.

What are the benefits of CBD?

CBD has many therapeutic properties. It can act as an anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, antiemetic, and anti-anxiety agent. While the research is still developing, thus far the studies suggest that CBD can relieve or treat a variety of conditions, including:

  • Chronic pain and arthritis
  • Inflammation
  • Anxiety
  • PTSD
  • Depression
  • Psychosis, specifically that associated with schizophrenia
  • Nausea
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Migraines
  • Nicotine and opioid addiction
  • Muscle spasticity
  • Low appetite, such as from cancer treatment
  • Epilepsy and seizures

To date, CBD has only been officially approved by the FDA for treating epilepsy. Epidiolex is a CBD oral solution prescribed to treat two severe forms of epilepsy. Various states have approved CBD for treating other medical conditions, such as New Mexico, which approved it for PTSD.

How does CBD affect your body?

CBD, and other cannabinoids like THC, affect your body’s endocannabinoid system. Your endocannabinoid system is involved in regulating a variety of functions, including your mood, motor control, sleep, digestion, pain and inflammation.

Your endocannabinoid system is made up of endocannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors, and enzymes. The endocannabinoids your body produces are similar to external cannabinoids like CBD, which allows them to respond to each other.

When you ingest CBD, it binds to cannabinoid receptors throughout your brain and body. These are located throughout your nervous system, digestive system, and immune system. In binding to these receptors, CBD helps your endocannabinoid system communicate better with these other systems, enabling it to create the positive health effects like reduced inflammation and pain relief.  

How do you take CBD?

Although CBD oil is one of the most popular CBD products, CBD is available in many forms. There are four main ways to ingest CBD, including:

Which CBD product is best for you depends largely on personal preference. However, the way you ingest CBD can determine how quickly it affects your system, as well as how long those effects last.

For example, it can take longer to feel the effects through oral ingestion, since your body has to digest and absorb the CBD. Of all four methods, inhalation delivers the effects most quickly, but they’ll diminish sooner, too. The effects of CBD tend to be longer-lasting with oral, sublingual, and transdermal administration.

How much CBD should you take?

The dosage of CBD also plays a role in how strongly you feel the effects of CBD. When used in clinical studies, oral doses tend to range from 100 to 800 mg/day. However, the rule of thumb is 1 to 6 mg per 10 pounds of body weight.

Any CBD products you purchase will provide dosing guidelines. Use these for guidance. Because there are no official dosing guidelines, it’s safest to start with the minimum dose and work your way up until you feel the effects. Your dose may vary depending on your body weight, tolerance, and other factors like medication you may be taking.

If CBD is legal in your state, you can speak to your doctor or your pharmacist about how much they’d recommend, and if they expect CBD to have any adverse side effects with any of your prescription medications.

Once you find a dose that works, stick with it. Unlike THC, individuals do not develop a tolerance to CBD. That means your dose should continue to work for you, unless other variables change significantly (like your body weight).

Is CBD safe to use?

CBD is generally considered safe. It’s rare to experience side effects from taking CBD. When side effects occur, it’s typically from the interaction between CBD and other medications the person is taking, as opposed to being caused directly by the CBD itself.

However, because it’s not yet regulated by the FDA, that gives manufacturers some wiggle room in how accurately they label their products. According to a 2017 study of 84 CBD products sold online, only about a third were accurately labeled in regards to the amount of CBD. Worse, THC was detected in over 20% of the products. Vape liquids were the largest offenders, while CBD oils tended to have the most accurate labels.

Besides THC, there may be other ingredients in the CBD product that you don’t wish to ingest. Always carefully read the label when purchasing CBD online, and use these products with caution.

Is CBD legal?

Due to varying state and federal laws, the legality of CBD is cloudy at best. Because it contains less than 0.3% THC, in theory CBD should be legal in most states. However, since cannabis is still illegal at a federal level, that creates some uncertainty around its legal status.

Typically, if you live in one of the states where medical or recreational marijuana is legalized, CBD is likely to be legalized as well. If you have concerns about the legality of CBD where you live, review the CBD laws in your state.


The cannabis plant comes in two main varieties: Cannabis Sativa and Cannabis Indica. Either subspecies contains over 100 chemical compounds (called cannabinoids), including CBD (cannabidiol) and THC (tetrahydrocannabinol).

Marijuana derives from either variety of cannabis, but hemp only comes from the Cannabis Sativa plant. Hemp plants contain very little THC, the compound responsible for the psychoactive effects of cannabis. Instead, they contain a much higher concentration of CBD, the non-psychoactive compound in cannabis. The majority of CBD products are sourced from hemp.

CBD provides various health effects, from anxiety and pain relief to better skin and heart health. However, because CBD is separate from THC, the psychoactive compound of cannabis, CBD users can enjoy the health benefits of CBD without experiencing the “high” associated with marijuana. This enables users to safely use CBD without worrying about being high disrupting their daily lives

CBD Benefits Chart

The list of benefits CBD provides is long and growing, as scientists continue to unearth new health benefits and use cases for CBD. This chart provides an overview of the benefits we’ll review in the following sections.

Benefits of CBD
Relieves arthritis pain
Relieves chronic pain
Reduces chronic nerve pain
Reduces inflammation
Reduces muscle spasms and other MS symptoms
Reduces chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting for cancer patients
May slow cancer cell growth
Relieves anxiety and depression
Relieves insomnia and improves sleep
Helps treat acne and psoriasis
Aids nicotine and heroin addiction recovery by reducing withdrawal symptoms

CBD Benefits for Pain Relief

Several studies show that CBD provides relief for chronic pain stemming from arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and other conditions. The body’s endocannabinoid system is involved in regulating your emotions, motor control, immune system, and pain response. When the body ingests CBD, it affects the way your body perceives and responds to pain.

One study of rats found that CBD reduced their acute pain response to surgical incision both immediately and in the long-term. Another study found that CBD’s anti-inflammatory properties significantly reduce chronic nerve pain and inflammation.

CBD has also been shown to reduce spasticity among individuals with multiple sclerosis, enabling them to walk more easily with less pain. In a study of individuals with rheumatoid arthritis, a daily CBD spray treatment reduced pain both when the person was moving and when they were at rest.

CBD Benefits for Cancer Patients

In addition to their illness, cancer patients often live with several uncomfortable symptoms, like pain, depression, and sleep issues. Worse, the treatment for cancer often results in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. CBD can relieve all of these cancer symptoms.

Not all cancer patients adequately respond to traditional pain medication like opioids. Of the ones who do, they may develop an addiction to the drugs. CBD provides an alternative treatment that is non-habit forming and even more effective, according to the research. One study that CBD reduced pain 30% more than traditional medication or THC alone.  

Nausea and vomiting are two of the most common—and most feared—symptoms of chemotherapy. These symptoms can be so intense that they lead 25 to 50% of cancer patients to ultimately delay or refuse this life-saving treatment. Fortunately, CBD can significantly control and reduce both of these symptoms. In one study of cancer patients, researchers administered a daily CBD/THC spray or placebo to participants during the 5 days following their chemotherapy. The individuals who received the CBD spray experienced a 49% reduction in nausea and vomiting-related symptoms.

There’s also a growing body of evidence suggesting that CBD may actually facilitate cancer cell death and slow the spread of aggressive cancer cells for breast cancer, although the research is still in early stages.

CBD Benefits for Anxiety Disorders

Much like how CBD affects the way the body perceives and remembers pain, CBD can also change the endocannabinoid system’s response to anxiety disorders and depression.

In one study of individuals with social anxiety disorder and a phobia of public speaking, participants were separated into two groups. One received a single dose of 600mg CBD while the other received a placebo, an hour and a half before they participated in a simulated public speaking test. The individuals who received CBD experienced significant reductions in their anxiety, as well as in the cognitive impairment and discomfort they felt while public speaking.

study showing how CBD helps anxiety

Researchers also evaluated the participants’ self assessments of their public speaking performance. The tendency for the placebo group to make negative self-assessments was nearly fully absent among the CBD group.

CBD has also been shown to have antidepressant-like effects and to help motivate social interaction.

CBD Benefits for Sleep

In many instances, insomnia and sleep issues accompany anxiety disorders. In one study of pediatric post-traumatic stress disorder, CBD was shown to consistently improve sleep quality over a period of 5 months—in the absence of any pharmaceutical drugs. A once daily 12-25 mg CBD treatment enabled the individual to sleep through the night and experience better quality sleep, with less overall anxiety during the day.

REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a potentially dangerous sleep disorder that, left untreated, often develops into a neurodegenerative disease like Parkinson’s or lewy body dementia. In healthy REM sleep, muscle atonia sets in, paralyzing the muscles so we don’t physically act out our dreams. With RBD, however, the muscle atonia is not present, enabling individuals to move violently during sleep and put themselves at risk of injury. CBD has been shown to immediately and significantly control the physical symptoms of RBD, reducing the occurrence of RBD without any negative side effects.

In the rheumatoid arthritis study we cited above, the CBD treatment also improved quality of sleep for the RA patients—as well as their pain—demonstrating how the benefits of CBD are not limited and can treat multiple symptoms at once.

CBD Benefits for Skin Issues

As an anti-inflammatory, CBD can also treat skin issues like acne and psoriasis.

In addition to genetics and other factors, one possible cause for acne is the overproduction of oil sebum by inflamed sebaceous glands in the skin. Studies have found that CBD is particularly effective at slowing or inhibiting production of human sebocytes.

Psoriasis is another skin disorder, characterized by a rapid buildup of skin cells that results in inflammation, redness, and scaling of the skin. As an autoimmune condition, early research suggests CBD’s anti-inflammatory properties may also help treat psoriasis.

CBD Benefits for Addiction Recovery

CBD may also be instrumental in helping people overcome nicotine or opioid addiction, by alleviating the symptoms of withdrawal.

One study of smokers who wanted to quit smoking gave participants an inhaler of either CBD or a placebo. Over the course of one week, they were told to use the inhaler whenever they felt the urge to smoke. At the end of the week, those with the placebo inhaler smoked the same amount of cigarettes as they had before the study. Participants with the CBD inhaler, however, reduced the total number of cigarettes they smoked by 40%.

Part of why CBD is uniquely helpful for those in addiction recovery, as opposed to THC (which can provide many of the same health benefits), is because CBD provides all the same benefits without the risk of addiction. THC appears to increase sensitivity to other drugs, which can end up rewarding drug-seeking behavior. CBD, on the other hand, CBD provides the same health benefits while inhibiting drug-seeking behavior, thereby reducing an individual’s risk for abuse and relapse.

cbd vs thc

The studies for CBD as an aid to heroin addiction recovery are promising, as regular CBD treatment significantly reduces an individual’s cravings for the drug. Even more promising is the fact that these effects appear to get stronger with time, with craving reduction lasting as long as 7 days after the initial CBD treatment.

Future Benefits of CBD

The research looking into the benefits of CBD continues to grow as scientists uncover more benefits of cannabidiol. The research is still in development, but early findings include:

  • CBD reduced monthly seizures by 36.5% among individuals with severe epilepsy. Among children with Dravet syndrome, the number of monthly convulsive seizures decreased by over 50%.
  • CBD significantly increased quality-of-life scores among Parkinson’s disease patients.
  • CBD may prevent the neurodegeneration and cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • The anti-inflammatory properties of CBD may prevent heart damage among those with
  • CBD may also prevent diabetes. One study of non-obese diabetic mice found that CBD treatment reduced the incidence of diabetes by 56%, with additional anti-inflammatory  benefits.diabetes and heart disease, by slowing cell death, inflammation, and oxidative stress.
  • CBD can reduce the psychotic symptoms associated with schizophrenia, due to its effect on brain activity in the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex.
  • In a study of healthy men, an acute dose of 600mg of CBD reduced blood pressure response in stressful situations.

The health benefits of CBD are numerous, and continue to grow. One reason for CBD’s increasing popularity among researchers and users is that it appears to relieve many distressing symptoms for a variety of disorders— but without the negative side effects of traditional medication. Learn more about CBD at the links below: